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Guidance

Regulatory decisions: Procedures and guidance for regulatory hearings

Guidance to assist Directors or the Regulatory Panel to carry out their regulatory functions in accordance with our policies and procedures and to comply with the law.

Conflicts of interest

Commissioners and senior employees are required to complete a declaration of their outside interests. The Gambling Commission also has a strict policy on the acceptance of gifts and hospitality. Even so, care must also be taken to ensure that in every case there is no conflict of interest or the risk that there may be a perception of a conflict of interest.

Decision makers may have a conflict of interest in a matter if it affects them, their friends, relatives or employer. If a decision maker has a personal and potentially prejudicial interest in a matter then they:

  • must not take a decision or sit as a member of a Regulatory Panel, or otherwise take part in the decision making process
  • must leave the room when that item is being discussed and must not participate in or give the appearance of trying to participate in the making of a decision
  • must not lobby those who will be making the decision in question.

Decision makers must take care to avoid giving the impression that they are not independent or impartial or that their decision making process is biased, or there is a risk of apparent bias.

If a decision maker is in any doubt about whether there might be a possible conflict of interest then they should seek advice from the Commission’s legal advisers.

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The legal framework for decision making
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