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Strategy

National Strategy to Reduce Gambling Harms

The sole aim of this three-year National Strategy is to move faster and go further to reduce gambling harms.

Purpose

Businesses and other key organisations with a role in reducing gambling harms need to work, with their regulators, to continue to develop and improve existing practice, and to identify new ways to reduce gambling harms.

Working collaboratively in a coordinated manner to focus efforts and share more widely what does and does not work, will achieve greater impact than more isolated efforts.

The gambling industry is increasingly collaborating on activities to promote safer gambling, and even more can be achieved through active targeting, direction and support for this collaboration by the Gambling Commission as the industry regulator.

Working towards the outcomes in this strategy is by no means restricted to the gambling industry and will require collaboration by all businesses and partners involved in reducing gambling harms.

These include national and local health and social care bodies, commissioning bodies, service providers for prevention and treatment programmes and third sector organisations in order to make real progress.

Image 7 - Groups involved in collaboration - this image shows the circles containing the groups involved in this collaboration, being interlinked with smaller circles.

Groups involved in collaboration:

  • Government departments responsible for gambling, health and education
  • public health bodies
  • research community including individual academics, research centres and charities
  • businesses such as gambling, financial, advertising and technology
  • health and social care services including funding, commissioning, treatment provision, oversight, professional bodies and charities
  • regulators national, local, international (applying advice from the Advisory Board for Safer Gambling)
  • consumers service users, and those with lived experience
  • third sector education and support charities, including GambleAware, Citizens Advice and other advisory services.
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Working in partnership
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