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Live return to player performance monitoring of games of chance

Published:
25 January 2021
Updated:
1 February 2021

Remote operators are required to monitor the performance of the games they offer.

Remote technical standards: section 5(tk)

Even though games must be tested prior to release (and after updates which may affect fairness) it is possible for a design, implementation or operational issue to evade identification during testing or deployment. This may affect the game’s RTP and result in either an overpaying or underpaying product.

If you provide applicable products you must have processes in place to measure the ongoing performance of games. These would usually be periodic reports or automated backend processes running over the stored transactional data.

You should raise alerts where a game appears to be falling outside the acceptable performance range. You should keep appropriate records as evidence of these processes as well as any more detailed investigations that have been performed as a result of an alert or an escalated customer complaint that warrants such an investigation.

Where a game indicates an error in its performance that is confirmed upon further investigation a key event must be submitted.

Businesses in scope for the annual games testing audit (those who produce and update games and obtain the external testing by approved test houses) part of this audit will involve a review of RTP monitoring processes for adequacy.

While the focus of this guidance is on RNG driven products with a statistically defined RTP, such as slots games, there will be some performance monitoring applicable for other products as indicated in some of the examples. This will generally include products such as bingo, peer-to-peer poker, blackjack and virtual sports where skill or player choices can influence the return. For these products the focus of monitoring would instead be on the frequency and distribution of possible event outcomes to ensure they are acceptably random.

The overall aim of this monitoring is to ensure games are operating fairly as designed and advertised.

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How to calculate return to player (RTP)
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