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Report

Annual Report and Accounts 2020 to 2021

The Gambling Commission's 2020 to 2021 Annual Report and Accounts

  1. Contents
  2. Accountability report
  3. Remuneration and staff report

Remuneration and staff report

Remuneration report

This report covers the 12 months ending 31 March 2021 and sets out the policy and disclosures in relation to the remuneration of the Commissioners and senior managers of the Commission.

Commissioners

The Chairman and Commissioners are appointed by the Secretary of State on terms set on the basis of advice from the Civil Service Senior Salaries Review Body.

Appointments are for a period of between three and five years and may be renewed for a further term. Appointments may be terminated at any time by either party giving written notice.

Bill Moyes was appointed as Chairman for a five-year term commencing 5 September 2016. His contract provides for the Chairman to work two days per week on average. Commissioners work on average one day per week.

Commissioners’ contracts may be terminated by written notice where the Secretary of State has reason to believe that the Commissioner has been absent from Commission meetings, without explanation, for a period of longer than three months; has become bankrupt or made an arrangement with a creditor; has been convicted of a criminal ofence; has breached the Code of Conduct for Board members; or has become incapacitated by physical or mental illness.

The Commissioners’ appointments are not pensionable under the Civil Service pension scheme and no contributions have been paid by the Commission to any other scheme.

Diversity breakdown for the Board of Commissioners:

  • male Board members 70%
  • female Board members 30%.

Independent member of Audit and Risk Committee

The Commission appointed Chris Andrew on a three-year contract with efect from 2 January 2019 as an independent member of the Audit and Risk Committee, for which a payment is made. His appointment followed the departure of previous independent member, Ann Harris.

Senior managers

Senior managers are normally employed directly by the Commission. Increases in pay are performance based and are broadly in line with senior Civil Service pay bands. Performance targets are set and measured in accordance with the Commission’s policy on pay and reward.

The process for the agreement of the executive teams’ performance targets, achievements against targets, and recommendations on changes in remuneration, is reviewed by the Remuneration Committee. Except during probation or where guilty of gross misconduct, senior managers’ contracts may be terminated by either party giving 12 weeks written notice.

Details of all executive directors serving during the year are provided at Appendix 1 from page 78, including the duration of their service.

Remuneration (including salary) and pension entitlements

The following sections provide details of the remuneration and pension interests of the Commissioners and Directors. This has been subject to audit review.

Remuneration of Senior Managers (salary, expenses and payments in kind) – audited information

Directors2020 to 20212019 to 2020
Salary
in bands of £5k)
Bonus Payments
(in bands of £5k)
Expenses as BiK**
(to nearest £100)
Pension Benefits
(to nearest £1,000)
Total
(in bands of £5k)
Salary
(in bands of £5k)
Bonus Payments
(in bands of £5k)
Expenses as BiK**
(to nearest £100)
Pension Benefits
(to nearest £1,000 )
Total
(in bands of £5k)
Victoria Beaumount
Executive Director – HR
100-105--41,000140-145100-1050-5-39,000140-145
Sarah Gardner
Deputy Chief Executive (Joint Acting Chief Executive – from12 February 2021)
115-120
(130-135 fye)*
--99,000215-22075-80
(105-110 fye)*
--33,000110-115
Sally Jones
Chief Operating Officer (from 26 Oct 20) (Joint Acting Chief Executive – from12 February 2021)
45-50
(120-125 fye)*
-19,00065-70-----
Neil McArthur
Chief Executive (left the organisation 30 June 2021)
145-150-71,000215-220140-14510-15-59,000215-220
Tim Miller
Executive Director - Insight and Safer Gambling
110-115--43,000150-155105-1105-10-43,000160-165
Marie Perry
Chief Financial Officer
100-105--40,000140-14520-25
(100-105fye)*
--10,00030-35
John Tanner
Executive Director - 4NLC
140-145--165,000305-310100-105
(135-140fye)*
--314,000415-420
Alistair Quigley
Chief Technology Officer
95-100--59,000150-15590-95
(95-100fye)*
0-5-59,000150-155
Helen Venn
Executive Director - Licensing and Compliance
100-105--41,000140-14595-1000-5-40,000140-145
Richard Watson
Executive Director - Enforcement and Intellegence
100-105--41,000140-14595-1000-5-40,000145-150

Former employees

Directors2020 to 20212019 to 2020
Salary
in bands of £5k)
Bonus Payments
(in bands of £5k)
Expenses as BiK**
(to nearest £100)
Pension Benefits
(to nearest £1,000)
Total
(in bands of £5k)
Salary
(in bands of £5k)
Bonus Payments
(in bands of £5k)
Expenses as BiK**
(to nearest £100)
Pension Benefits
(to nearest £1,000 )
Total
(in bands of £5k)
Ann Harris
Interim Executive Director - 4NLC(from 30 July 2018 to 31 May 2019)
-----10-15
(60-65fye)*
-3004,00010-15
Nicky Heathcote
Interim Executive Director - Regulatory Policy and Governance(from 21 May 2018 to 31 May 2019)
-----15-20
(100-105fye)*
--25,00040-45
Paul Hope
Executive Director – Consumers and Regulatory Strategy(to 31 December 2020)
75-80(110-115 fye*)--35,000110-115100-1050-5-41,000195-200
Philip Lloyd
Interim Chief Financial Officer(from 30 July 2018 to 17 January 2020)
-----105-110
(130-135fye)*
--41,000145-150
Tamsin Morgan
Director of Communications(to 19 February 2021)
90-95(100-105 fye*)---90-9595-100---95-100
David Pemberton
Executive Director – digital and planning(from 19 June 2017 to 19 July 2019)
-----30-35
(100-105fye)*
--12,00040-45
Natalie Prosser
General Counsel(from 02 November 2020 to 31 January 2021)
20-25(90-95 fye*)--12,00030-35-----
Details2020 to 20212019 to 2020
Band of highest paid directors total remuneration (£'000)145-150155-160
Median total remuneration39,16336,754
Range of staff remuneration (£'000)18 to 145-15018 to 155-160
Ratio3:76:14.29:1

Fair pay disclosures:

  • 2% the average percentage change in base salary from the previous financial year in respect of the employees of the entity taken as a whole
  • 2% 2020-21 highest paid director percentage change in base salary from previous financial year.

Remuneration of Commissioners (salary, expenses and payments in kind) – audited information

Directors2020 to 20212019 to 2020
Salary
in bands of £5k)
Bonus Payments
(in bands of £5k)
Expenses as BiK**
(to nearest £100)
Pension Benefits
(to nearest £1,000)
Total
(in bands of £5k)
Salary
(in bands of £5k)
Bonus Payments
(in bands of £5k)
Expenses as BiK**
(to nearest £100)
Pension Benefits
(to nearest £1,000 )
Total
(in bands of £5k)
Chris Andrew
Independent Audit Committee Member
0-5---0-50-5-1,200-0-5
David Rossington
Independent Committee Member NL
0-5---0-50-5---0-5
Terry Babbs (from 30 April 2020)10-15---10-15-----
John Baillie10-15-600-10-1510-15-3,900-15-20
Brian Bannister (from 30 April 2020)10-15---10-15-----
Carol Brady10-15---10-1510-15-400-10-15
Stephen Cohen10-15-100-10-1510-15-1,400-15-20
Jo Hill***(from 30 April 2020)0
(10-15fye)*
---0
(10-15fye)*
-----
Bill Moyes
Chairman
55-60-800-55-6055-60-7,600-60-65
Trevor Pearce10-15---10-1510-15-2,500-15-20
Catharine Seddon10-15-100-10-1510-15-800-10-15

Previous non executives

Directors2020 to 20212019 to 2020
Salary
in bands of £5k)
Bonus Payments
(in bands of £5k)
Expenses as BiK**
(to nearest £100)
Pension Benefits
(to nearest £1,000)
Total
(in bands of £5k)
Salary
(in bands of £5k)
Bonus Payments
(in bands of £5k)
Expenses as BiK**
(to nearest £100)
Pension Benefits
(to nearest £1,000 )
Total
(in bands of £5k)
Alison Hastings
(to 30 August 2019)
-----5-10-900-5-10
Martin Narey
(From 30 April 2020 to 31 May 2020)
0-5---0-5-----
Sarika Patel
(to 25 November 2019)
-----5-10-600-10-15
Simone Pennie
(to 31 May 2019)
-----0-5---0-5
Jonathan Scott
(to 30 April 2020)
0-5--0-510-15-1,400-15-20

Salary:

‘Salary’ includes gross salary, overtime, reserved rights to London weighting or London allowances, recruitment and retention allowances, private ofce allowances and any other allowance to the extent that it is subject to UK taxation. This report is based on accrued payments made by the Commission and thus recorded in these accounts.

Apart from the Chair and Chief Executive, all Commissioners are paid a fixed amount for work that entails approximately one day of time per week. No employees or Commissioners were remunerated by way of service companies or third parties.

Expenses as benefits in kind:

The Commission incurred costs for travel, subsistence and accommodation in respect of the Chairman and the Commissioners whilst attending meetings at Victoria Square House. These expenses could be viewed as benefits in kind and treated by HM Revenue & Customs as a taxable emolument. To avoid doubt, such taxes are paid by the Commission.

Bonuses:

Bonuses are based on performance levels attained and are made as part of the appraisal process. Bonuses relate to the performance in the year in which they become payable to the individual. There were no bonuses paid to Directors during 2020-21, the comparative bonuses reported for 2019-20 relate to the performance in 2019-20.

Pay multiples – audited information:

The Commission is required to disclose the relationship between the remuneration of the highest-paid director in their organisation and the median remuneration of the Commission’s workforce.

The banded remuneration of the highest paid director in the Commission in the financial year 2020-21 was £145,000-£150,000 (2019-20, £155,000-£160,000). This was 3.76 times (2019-20, 4.29 times) the median remuneration of the workforce, which was £39,163 (2019-20, £36,754). In 2020-21, 0 (2019-20, 0) employees received remuneration in excess of the highest paid director. Remuneration ranged from £18,000 to £147,000 (2019-20, £18,000-£158,000).

Total remuneration includes salary, non-consolidated performance-related pay and benefits-in-kind. It does not include severance payments, employer pension contributions and the cash equivalent transfer value of pensions.

Pension benefits 2020-21 – audited information

Accrued pension at pension age as at 31/03/21
(in bands of £5,000)
Accrued Lump Sum pension at pension age as at 31/03/21
(in bands of £5k)
Real increase in pension at pension age
(in bands of £2,500)
Real increase in pension Lump Sum at pension age
(in bands of £2,500)
CETV at 31/03/21
£'000s
CETV at 31/03/20
£'000s
Real increase in CETV
£'000s
Employer contribution to partnership pension account
(nearest £100)
Victoria Beaumount
Executive Director – HR
0-5-0-2.5-694118-
Sarah Gardner
Deputy Chief Executive (Joint Acting Chief Executive)
35-4075-805-7.55-7.558049759-
Sally Jones
Chief Operating Officer (Joint Acting Chief Executive)(from 26 Oct 2020)
0-5-0-2.5-15-12-
Neil McArthur
Chief Executive(to 30 June 2021)
55-60120-1252.5-50-2.51,0851,00045-
Tim Miller
Executive Director - Insight and Safer Gambling
10-15-2.5-50-2.51118317-
Marie Perry
Chief Financial Officer
5-10-0-2.5-785118-
John Tanner
Executive Director - 4NLC
60-65185-1907.5-1022.5-251,4661,251167-
Alistair Quigley
Chief Technology Officer
20-25-2.5-5-40835633-
Helen Venn
Executive Director - Licensing and Compliance
35-40-0-2.5-51046323-
Richard Watson
Executive Director - Enforcement and Intellegence
15-20-0-2.5-25721426-

Former employees

Accrued pension at pension age as at 31/03/21
(in bands of £5,000)
Accrued Lump Sum pension at pension age as at 31/03/21
(in bands of £5k)
Real increase in pension at pension age
(in bands of £2,500)
Real increase in pension Lump Sum at pension age
(in bands of £2,500)
CETV at 31/03/21
£'000s
CETV at 31/03/20
£'000s
Real increase in CETV
£'000s
Employer contribution to partnership pension account
(nearest £100)
Paul Hope
Director – Consumers and Regulatory Strategy (to 31 December 2020)
40-4590-950-2.50-2.572769821 -
Tamsin Morgan
Director of Communications (to 19 February 2021)
- - - - - - - -
Natalie Prosser
General Counsel (from 2 November 2020 to 31 January 2021)
20-25 - 0-2.5 - 2912755 -

Civil Service Pensions

Pension benefits are provided through the Civil Service pension arrangements.

From 1 April 2015 a new pension scheme for civil servants was introduced – the Civil Servants and Others Pension Scheme or alpha, which provides benefits on a career average basis with a normal pension age equal to the member’s State Pension Age (or 65 if higher). From that date all newly appointed civil servants and the majority of those already in service joined alpha. Prior to that date, civil servants participated in the Principal Civil Service Pension Scheme (PCSPS).

The PCSPS has four sections:

  • three providing benefits on a final salary basis (classic, premium or classic plus) with a normal pension age of 60
  • one providing benefits on a whole career basis (nuvos) with a normal pension age of 65.

These statutory arrangements are unfunded with the cost of benefits met by monies voted by Parliament each year. Pensions payable under classic, premium, classic plus, nuvos and alpha are increased annually in line with Pensions Increase legislation. Existing members of the PCSPS who were within 10 years of their normal pension age on 1 April 2012 remained in the PCSPS after 1 April 2015. Those who were between 10 years and 13 years and five months from their normal pension age on 1 April 2012 will switch into alpha sometime between 1 June 2015 and 1 February 2022. All members who switch to alpha have their PCSPS benefits ‘banked’, with those with earlier benefits in one of the final salary sections of the PCSPS having those benefits based on their final salary when they leave alpha. (The pension figures quoted for officials show pension earned in PCSPS or alpha – as appropriate.)

Where the official has benefits in both the PCSPS and alpha the figure quoted is the combined value of their benefits in the two schemes.) Members joining from October 2002 may opt for either the appropriate defined benefit arrangement or a ‘money purchase’ stakeholder pension with an employer contribution (partnership pension account).

Employee contributions are salary-related and range between 4.6% and 8.05% for members of classic, premium, classic plus, nuvos and alpha. Benefits in classic accrue at the rate of 1/80th of final pensionable earnings for each year of service. In addition, a lump sum equivalent to three years initial pension is payable on retirement. For premium, benefits accrue at the rate of 1/60th of final pensionable earnings for each year of service. Unlike classic, there is no automatic lump sum. Classic plus is essentially a hybrid with benefits for service before 1 October 2002 calculated broadly as per classic and benefits for service from October 2002 worked out as in premium.

In nuvos a member builds up a pension based on pensionable earnings during their period of scheme membership. At the end of the scheme year (31 March) the member’s earned pension account is credited with 2.3% of their pensionable earnings in that scheme year and the accrued pension is uprated in line with Pensions Increase legislation. Benefits in alpha build up in a similar way to nuvos, except that the accrual rate in 2.32%. In all cases members may opt to give up (commute) pension for a lump sum up to the limits set by the Finance Act 2004 (opens in new tab).

The partnership pension account is a stakeholder pension arrangement. The employer makes a basic contribution of between 8% and 14.75% (depending on the age of the member) into a stakeholder pension product chosen by the employee from a panel of providers. The employee does not have to contribute, but where they do make contributions, the employer will match these up to a limit of 3% of pensionable salary (in addition to the employer’s basic contribution). Employers also contribute a further 0.5% of pensionable salary to cover the cost of centrally provided risk benefit cover (death in service and ill health retirement).

The accrued pension quoted is the pension the member is entitled to receive when they reach pension age, or immediately on ceasing to be an active member of the scheme if they are already at or over pension age. Pension age is 60 for members of classic, premium and classic plus, 65 for members of nuvos, and the higher of 65 or State Pension Age for members of alpha. (The pension figures quoted for officials show pension earned in PCSPS or alpha – as appropriate. Where the official has benefits in both the PCSPS and alpha the figure quoted is the combined value of their benefits in the two schemes but note that part of that pension may be payable from different ages).

Further details about the Civil Service pension arrangements can be found at the website www.civilservicepensionscheme.org.uk (opens in new tab)

Cash Equivalent Transfer Values (CETV)

A Cash Equivalent Transfer Value (CETV) is the actuarially assessed capitalised value of the pension scheme benefits accrued by a member at a particular point in time.

The benefits valued are the member’s accrued benefits and any contingent spouse’s pension payable from the scheme. A CETV is a payment made by a pension scheme or arrangement to secure pension benefits in another pension scheme or arrangement when the member leaves a scheme and chooses to transfer the benefits accrued in their former scheme. The pension figures shown relate to the benefits that the individual has accrued as a consequence of their total membership of the pension scheme, not just their service in a senior capacity to which disclosure applies.

The figures include the value of any pension benefit in another scheme or arrangement which the member has transferred to the Civil Service pension arrangements. They also include any additional pension benefit accrued to the member as a result of their buying additional pension benefits at their own cost. CETVs are worked out in accordance with The Occupational Pension Schemes (Transfer Values) (Amendment) Regulations 2008 (opens in new tab) and do not take account of any actual or potential reduction to benefits resulting from Lifetime Allowance Tax which may be due when pension benefits are taken.

Real increase in CETV

This reflects the increase in CETV that is funded by the employer. It does not include the increase in accrued pension due to inflation, contributions paid by the employee (including the value of any benefits transferred from another pension scheme or arrangement) and uses common market valuation factors for the start and end of the period.

Compensation for loss of office – audited information

27 employees left under Voluntary Exit terms during the period 30 June 2020 and 7 February 2021. They received separate compensation payments totalling £1,012,350. None of the employees effected were senior managers or executives.

Remuneration Committee

The members of the Remuneration Committee consists of Trevor Pearce (Chair), Carol Brady and Catharine Seddon. Catharine joined the Committee in 2020 with her first meeting in July 2020.

Staff Report

a) Analysis of Commissioners and employee costs – audited information

2020-21 Permanent
£’000s
2020-21 Short term
£’000s
2020-21 Total
£’000s
2019-20 Total
£’000s
Salaries and wages15,40757315,98014,321
Social security costs1,492651,5571,512
Other pension costs3,6861653,8513,658
Total Commissioners and staff costs20,58580321,38819,491

b) Retirement benefits

The following disclosures are made in accordance with IAS 19, 'Employee Benefits'.

(i) Employees

The Commission provides pension benefits for permanent staff under the Principal Civil Service Pension Scheme (PCSPS). The PCSPS is an unfunded multi-employer defined benefit scheme in which the Commission is unable to identify its share of the underlying assets and liabilities. A full actuarial valuation was carried out as at 31 March 2021. Details can be found in the resource accounts of the Cabinet Office: Civil Superannuation (opens in new tab).

For 2020-21, employers' contributions of £3,789,953 were payable to the PCSPS (2019-20: £3,608,473) at one of four rates in the range 26.6% to 30.3% (2019-20: 26.6% to 30.3%) of pensionable pay, based on salary bands.

The Scheme Actuary reviews employer contributions usually every four years following a full scheme valuation. The salary bands and contribution rates were revised for 2019-20 and will remain unchanged until 2021-22. The contribution rates reflect benefits as they are accrued, not when the costs are actually incurred, and reflect past experience of the scheme. The contribution rates are set to meet the cost of the benefits accruing during 2020-21 to be paid when the member retires and not the benefits paid during this period to existing pensioners.

Employees can opt to open a partnership pension account, a stakeholder pension with an employer contribution. Employers’ contributions of £52,528 (2019-20: £53,405) were paid to one or more of the panel of three appointed stakeholder pension providers. Employer contributions are age-related and ranged from 8 to 14.75% (2019-20: 8 to 14.75%) of pensionable pay.

Employers also match employee contributions up to 3% of pensionable pay. In addition, employer contributions of £0, 0.0% of pensionable pay, were payable to the PCSPS to cover the cost of the future provision of lump sum benefits on death in service or ill health retirement of these employees.

Contributions due to the partnership pension providers at the balance sheet date were £370,193. No contributions were pre-paid.

(i) Former Director General – OFLOT

Upon the merger between the Gambling Commission and the National Lottery Commission in 2013, the Commission inherited a pension liability for a former Director General of OFLOT from 1993 to 1998. This pension is an unfunded defined benefit scheme which has benefits by analogy to the PCSPS and is paid directly from the Commission's own funds. In 2001, upon the recipient reaching retirement age, pension payments commenced.

A full actuarial valuation of both schemes was carried out by the Government Actuary at 31 March 2021 and the present value of the liability at 31 March 2021 is £215,000.

Sensitivity analysis

  1. Increasing the discount rate by 0.5% would result in a corresponding decrease in liabilities of approximately £9,000 or 4%.
  2. Increasing the CPI inflation assumption by 0.5% would result in a corresponding increase in liabilities of approximately £9,000 or 4%.
  3. Increasing assumed life expectancies in retirement by around one year would result in a corresponding increase in liabilities of approximately £7,000 or 3%.

The opposite changes in assumptions to those previously set out would produce approximately equal and opposite changes in the liability. Similarly, doubling the changes in the assumptions would produce approximately double the changes in the liability.

The sensitivities show the change in each assumption in isolation. In practice the financial assumptions rarely change in isolation and given the interdependencies between them, the impacts of such changes may offset each other to some extent.

Under IAS 19 the Commission is required to show the present value of these liabilities on its Statement of Financial Position.

Financial assumptions

The main financial assumptions and life expectancy assumptions used by the actuary in calculation of the liability for the schemes are as follows:

31 March 202131 March 2020
Discount rate for scheme liabilities1.25%1.80%
Rate on increase in salaries2.22%2.35%
Rate of increase for pensions in payment, in line with inflation2.22%2.35%
CPI inflation assumption2.22%2.35%

Life expectancy at retirement

Current pensionersAs at 31 March 2021As at 31 March 2020
Exact ageMen (years)Women (years)Men (years)Women (years)
6026.928.626.828.4
6522.023.721.923.5

c) Average number of persons employed – audited information

The average number of whole-time equivalent persons employed during the year was as follows:

2020 to 20212019 to 2020
Permanent staff327331
Other staff1120
Staff engaged on capital projects0-
Total338351

d) Of-payroll appointments

i For all off-payroll engagements as of 31 March 2021, for more than £245 per day and that last for longer than six months
No. of existing engagements as of 31 March 2021nil
of which...
No. that have existed for less than one year at time of reporting.nil
No. that have existed for between one and two years at time of reporting.nil
No. that have existed for between two and three years at time of reporting.nil
No. that have existed for between three and four years at time of reporting.nil
No. that have existed for four or more years at time of reporting.nil
Confirmation that all existing off-payroll engagements, outlined above, have at some point been subject to a risk based assessment as to whether assurance is required that the individual is paying the right amount of tax and, where necessary, that assurance has been sought.nil
ii For all new of-payroll engagements, or those that reached six months in duration, between 1 April 2020 and 31 March 2021, for more than £245 per day and that last for longer than six months
No. of new engagements, or those that reached six months in duration between 1 April 2020 and 31 March 20211
of which...
No. assessed as caught by IR35.1
No. assessed as not caught by IR35.nil
No. engaged directly (VIA PSC contracted to department) and are on the departmental payroll.nil
No. of engagements reassessed for consistency / assurance purposes during the year.nil
No. of engagements that saw a change to IR35 status following the consistency review.nil
iii. For any of-payroll engagements of board members, and/or senior officials with significant financial responsibility, between 1 April 2020 and 31 March 2021
No. of off-payroll engagements of board members, and/or, senior officials with significant financial responsibility, during the financial year.nil
Total no. of individuals on payroll and off-payroll that have been deemed ‘board members, and/or, senior officials with significant financial responsibility’ during the financial year21

Reporting of Civil Service and other compensation schemes – exit packages – audited information

2020-212019-19
Exit package cost band (including any special payment element)Compulsory redundancies
Number
Other departures agreed
Number
Total exit packages by cost band
Number
Compulsory redundancies
Number
Other departures agreed
Number
Total exit packages by cost band
Number
Less than £10,000------
£10,001 – £25,00011314-44
£25,001 – £50,000-88-11
£50,001 – £100,000-88-11
£100,001 – £150,000------
£150,001 – £200,000------
>£200,000------
Total number of exit packages12930-66
Total cost (£)19,9811,124,6031,144,584-195,524195,524

Redundancy and other departure costs have been paid in accordance with the provisions of the Civil Service Compensation Scheme, a statutory scheme made under the Superannuation Act 1972 (opens in new tab).

The table on the previous page shows the total cost of exit packages agreed and accounted for in 2020-21 (2019-20 comparative figures are also given). £1,012,350 exit costs (27 exits) were paid in 2020-21, the year of departure.

Exit costs are accounted for in full in the year of departure. Provisions have been created for 3 exits which have been agreed in year, but with a departure date after 31 March 2021. Where the department has agreed early retirements, the additional costs are met by the department and not by the Civil Service pension scheme. Ill-health retirement costs are met by the pension scheme and are not included in the table.

Consultancy costs

As per Note 3(b) of the Annual Accounts, consultancy costs totalling £2.0m (2019-20: £1.02m), £1.8m relates to increased costs relating to the National Lottery Competition on consultancy assignments.

Employment Statistics for 2020-21 (as at 31 March 2021)

Total Employment by contract type
Fixed Term Employees16
Permanent Employees319
Total335
Department split
Strategy13
Research, Statistics & Policy37
Regulatory Projects2
PMO6
People Services11
NSRGH7
Licensing42
Legal6
Enforcement & Intelligence48
Governance6
Finance12
Facilities4
Executive6
Executive Support8
Digital & Technology31
Data Infrastructure Projects1
Contact Centre14
Compliance36
Communications9
4NLC19
3NL, Policy & Major Projects17
Total335
Diversity – disability
Employees with a disability as defined under the Equality Act 201016
Employees without a disability as defined under the Equality Act 20109
Not disclosed310
Total335
Diversity – ethnic origin
Asian or Asian British – Indian16
Asian or Asian British – Other0
Asian or Asian British – Pakistani8
Black or Black British – African2
Black or Black British – Caribbean5
Mixed – White and Asian3
Mixed – White & Black Caribbean4
Not Disclosed34
Other Ethnic Background4
Other Mixed Background0
Other White Background5
White British244
White Irish4
Prefer Not to Say6
Total335
Diversity – age
24 and under10
25-3488
35-44109
45-5486
55-6442
65-740
Total335
Diversity – gender
Female172
Male163
Total335
Sickness absence rates
1 April 2019 to March 2020% of working days lost
Quarter 11.30
Quarter 21.30
Quarter 32.67
Quarter 42.09
Total1.84

Policies and procedures

The Commission has a range of policies and procedures in place relating to recruitment, sickness absence, learning and development and Dignity at Work.

Each of our policies aim to achieve fair practices for all job applicants and employees, ensuring that disability and all protected characteristics are managed fairly and appropriately. The Commission is also signed up to the Disability Confident scheme which guarantees interviews for candidates with disabilities who meet the criteria.

We continue to report on the Gender Pay Gap, and action we are taking to reduce it. We routinely report to the Board on workforce diversity. Equality issues are covered and assessed within each of our policies, and as part of our compliance with the Equalities Act 2010. Our Trade Union Partnership agreement has continued this year, alongside our Trade Union Health and Safety Committee which meets regularly.

Sickness rates

During the year, the average proportion of working days lost to sickness was 1.84% (2019-20: 5.08%) which includes long term absence related to mental health, covid/covid related, underlying health conditions and extended periods of recovery following operations. Our occupational health and employee assistance partners are providing us with ongoing support for colleagues and management alike.

Trade Union facility time

Relevant union officials
Number of employees who were relevant union officials during 2020-219.00
Full time equivalent employees who were relevant union officials during 2020-218.63
Percentage of time spent on facility time
%Number of employees
0-
1-509
51-90-
100-
Percentage of pay bill spent on facility time£'000s
Total cost of facility time24
Total pay bill21,388
Percentage of the total pay bill spent of facility time0.11%
Paid trade union activities
Time spent on paid trade union activities as a percentage of total paid facility time8%

References

* fye = full-year equivalent

** BiK = Benefits in Kind

*** Jo Hill has not received any payments from the Commission during 2020-21 due to existing employment commitments from her employer, she will be paid by the Commission from April 21 onwards.

CETV = Cash Equivalent Transfer Values

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