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Red tape linked to running some lotteries for good causes is set to be cut following a change in the law. 

From Wednesday (6 April) a number of changes to the Gambling Act will reduce the requirements for running some low level lotteries but the law will still ensure that they are run fairly to support charities and other good causes. 

The changes are the result of the previous Government’s Red Tape Challenge. Following a recommendation from the Gambling Commission the Department for Culture, Media and Sport carried out a consultation on proposed changes to some of the existing rules governing incidental non-commercial, private society, work and residents’ lotteries. 

Minister for Gambling and Lotteries David Evennett said: “This is welcome news for fundraisers across the country. 

"Government's decision to remove this unnecessary red tape will be of great benefit to charities and good causes, encouraging more people to hold small lotteries and raffles. 

“Money raised through lotteries makes a huge difference to local communities and this change in the law will ensure they continue to thrive.” 

As a result the following changes will occur: 

Private society lotteries: These can now be promoted by members of a private society for any charitable or non-commercial purpose - currently lotteries can only be promoted for the purposes for which the society is conducted. The requirement for a private society lottery ticket to contain certain information has been removed but all other existing rules remain the same.              

Work lotteries: Work lotteries can now be used for fundraising for any purpose other than private or commercial gain. Previously work lotteries could not be used for fundraising and all money collected had to be used for prizes or expenses incurred in organising the lottery. The requirement for a ticket in a work lottery to contain certain information has been removed but all other existing rules remain the same. 

Residents’ lotteries: Residents’ lotteries can now be used for fundraising for any purpose other than private or commercial gain. Previously residents’ lotteries could not be used for fundraising and all money collected had to be used for prizes or expenses incurred in organising the lottery. The requirement for a ticket in a residents’ lottery to contain certain information has been removed but all other existing rules remain the same.  

Incidental non-commercial lotteries: Renamed incidental lotteries, these can be held at both non-commercial and commercial events to raise money for charities and other good causes but they cannot be operated for private or commercial gain. Lottery results can now be announced during or after the event but all other existing rules remain the same, including the rule requiring that tickets can only be sold at the event and while it is taking place.

Notes to editors 

  1. Guidance on Organising small lotteries
  2. Quick guide to Running a lottery - helpful for fundraisers
  3. More information about how we regulate the gambling industry.
  4. Useful statistics on the gambling industry
  5. More information on prevention of money-laundering.

Journalists can contact our press office on 0121 230 6700 or email: communications@gamblingcommission.gov.uk

Posted on 04 April 2016