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Alternate Dispute Resolution (ADR)

All gambling businesses licensed by the Gambling Commission must appoint an alternate dispute resolution body (ADR) if customers gamble directly with them. The ADR is independent of the business, and will look at your complaint again.

The gambling business must choose their ADR from the approved list - ADRs must be approved by the Gambling Commission. They must name the ADR in their complaints procedure. You can only use an ADR that the gambling business has agreed to.

When to involve an ADR

The ADR will look at complaints about the outcome of your gambling.

You can ask the ADR to look at your case only after you have already complained to the gambling business, been through their complaints process and received their decision.

There is no cost to using an ADR

You will not need to pay the ADR to use the service, but if you are asked to provide any additional information you must meet any costs that this involves.

The ADR will acknowledge receipt of your complaint. They will aim to make a decision within 90 days. They should tell you if they think it will take longer than 90 days.

Once an ADR has given you their decision

If the ADR does not find in your favour, that will usually be the end of the matter. However, gambling contracts made since 1 September 2007 are legally enforceable under the Gambling Act 2005. This means that you can consider taking your complaint to court. If you decide to do this, you may want to consider taking independent legal advice.

If you are not happy with the service you have received from the ADR, for example, the time it has taken to deal with or the way they have updated you, you can report it to the Gambling Commission

Complaints about the way a gambling business is being run

If your complaint is about the way a gambling business is being run as opposed to a complaint about a transaction, for example if underage gambling is not being prevented, you can report it to us