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EuroMillions

We grant licences for each game, or class of games, promoted as part of the National Lottery. Lotto, EuroMillions, Thunderball, HotPicks, Scratchcards and Interactive Instant Win Games all have their own licences. The licence to run the National Lottery is called the Section 5 licence.

Whenever Camelot want to make changes to any of these games they must apply to us for approval. 

Before we will approve any changes and allow amendments to the game licence or licence additional games we look at issues like:

  • player protection
  • projected returns to good causes
  • protecting player funds
  • legality
  • impact on the National Lottery brand and intellectual property. 

We check that Camelot complies with the terms of those licences. 

Listed below is the history of changes to the EuroMillions licence and our reasons for agreeing them.
 


 

February 2017
Rationale for agreeing changes to EuroMillions 

In December 2016, Camelot sought approval to remove the implementation of a 12 month promotional UK-only Monthly Bonus Draw (offering online prizes up to £1m for each month of the promotion). 

We have considered this request and deemed that this would have minimal impact against our two primary duties of player protection and propriety, or secondary duty around returns to good causes. 

The change will in no way reduce the amount of prize funds available to players as the funds ear-marked for the Monthly Bonus Draw will be available for players to win through other EuroMillions promotional events. 

The licence for the EuroMillions and UK Millionaire Maker game was subsequently varied to allow Camelot to remove reference to the Monthly Bonus Draw in February 2017.


February 2017
Rationale for agreeing changes to EuroMillions 

In January 2016, Camelot served the Gambling Commission with a Notice of Investment Opportunity (the proposal) in accordance with the provision of licence condition 23 of the Third Licence which was granted to Camelot on 1 February 2009.

The proposal requested an annual investment of up to £6.7m for additional EuroMillions marketing support, to be shared between Camelot and good causes.

Decisions and reasons

We completed an evaluation process which considered the methodology and monitoring processes detailed in the proposal against our statutory duties. We are satisfied that no issues were identified in relation to propriety and player protection.

Given our two primary duties were satisfied, we considered the benefits to good causes.

The proposal stands to benefit good causes considerably over the course of the current licence to operate the National Lottery awarded to Camelot and which runs to January 2023.

We have decided to accept the proposal as we are satisfied that under condition 23 of the Licence:

  • It will secure an increase in the net proceeds of the National Lottery
  • It will continue to ensure that the National Lottery is run will all due propriety and the interests of every participant in the National Lottery are protected.

We will review the investment and can amend the amount that is invested annually out of lottery proceeds or cease to invest entirely at any point if we have concerns with its performance.


September 2016
Rationale for agreeing changes to EuroMillions 

In March 2016 Camelot sought approval for a change to the EuroMillions game, as part of a continuous refreshment programme of draw-based games. The licence for the EuroMillions and UK Millionaire Maker game was subsequently varied to allow Camelot to introduce the revised game in September 2016. 

The following changes are being made to the EuroMillions game in the UK:

  • increase in the overall price of a ticket from £2 to £2.50
  • increase in the number of balls from which the Lucky Stars are drawn, from 11 to 12 (which changes the odds of winning the jackpot from around 1 in 117 million to around 1 in 140 million)
  • increase in the number of guaranteed Millionaire Maker raffle prizes in each draw, from one x £1m to two x £1m
  • introduction of a promotional UK-only Monthly Bonus Draw, offering online prizes up to £1m for each month of the promotion for retail and online players (trial period now ended) 
  • introduction of an occasional pan-European raffle offering multiple prizes of up to £1 million to players across the EuroMillions community
  • increase in the base jackpot from €15 million to €17 million (based on expected sales)
  • increase in the Super Minimum Guaranteed Jackpot (SMJG) amount from €100 million to €140 million
  • change to the Jackpot cap rollover mechanic. 

The introduction of the Monthly Bonus draw and pan-European raffle also necessitates a change to the Secretary of State Directions, regarding the number of draws permitted in any two-hour period. This change is for the EuroMillions game only. 

In reviewing the request to change EuroMillions, we considered the proposal in line with our statutory duties.

As part of its proposed changes to EuroMillions, Camelot is introducing a Monthly Bonus Draw. We are content with the systems in place to manage this. 

Propriety (the game is fit and proper)

We were satisfied that the new game:

  • represents a legal lottery, in line with the definition in the Gambling Act 2005
  • is consistent with the National Lottery brand
  • has security measures in place to protect against fraud - from both a systems and processes and player funds perspective.

As part of its proposed changes to EuroMillions, Camelot is introducing a Monthly Bonus Draw. We are content with the systems in place to manage this.

Protecting the interests of players

We considered a number of issues such as the risk of excessive play and the potential for play by under 16s, as well as:

  • the impact of making the jackpot more difficult to win and thus increasing the probable number of rollovers (jackpot odds moving from 1 in 117m to 1 in 140m)
  • the impact of the price rise
  • unclaimed prize rates
  • fairness around the online Monthly Bonus Draw
  • risks regarding retailer fraud for all aspects of the game
  • how the changes will be communicated to players. 

The price of the core EuroMillions community jackpot game is increasing from €2 to €2.20. This will fund the pan-European raffle promotional draws, increase the base jackpot from €15m to €17m and an increase in the SMJG amount from €100m to €140m.

Camelot explored, through its research, a range of price points and additional prizes for UK players. Increasing the overall price for UK players to £2.50, a total increase of 50p, enables Camelot to use the additional funds for both the EuroMillions community jackpot game changes, and UK only enhancements. The UK only enhancements see an increase to the number of guaranteed UK Millionaires every draw from one to two, and the continuation of UK-only promotions, which are popular with players. 

The community and UK game enhancements are unaffordable without a price rise. Absorbing the community price rise into the existing price point of £2 would render the current UK game proposition unaffordable. As the core EuroMillions community jackpot game is increasing, and to improve upon the additional benefits that current UK players receive, the decision was taken by Camelot to propose an increase to the price in the UK. 

We also considered the impact of the proposed changes on the odds of winning, and how this may be perceived as a negative change by players. Camelot’s research indicated that the majority of players are more interested in prizes than the odds of the game. Our own research supports this. We noted that there is an improvement in the odds of becoming a millionaire due to the additional Millionaire Maker raffle prize. 

Having considered all of these points we were satisfied that permitting the changes to EuroMillions would be consistent with our statutory duty to protect interests of players.

Returns to good causes

Given that we were satisfied on player propriety and player protection, we went on to consider the projected returns to good causes. We accepted that the proposed changes would keep EuroMillions as a big rolling jackpot game as originally envisaged. We were satisfied with Camelot’s research, which showed that this change would likely have a positive impact upon returns to good causes.

We are satisfied that Camelot put forward a clear and consistent proposal for the changes to EuroMillions which were likely to be positive for good causes, players and the long term interests of the EuroMillions game. 


March 2014
Rationale for agreeing the provision of non-cash prizes for the UK element of the EuroMillions game 

In March 2014, Camelot sought approval for a number of changes to the EuroMillions and Millionaire Raffle Licence:

  • changing the name of the Millionaire Raffle, being the UK element of the EuroMillions game, to UK Millionaire Maker
  • addition of non-cash prizes to the UK Millionaire Maker
  • funding arrangements for non-cash prizes. 

In line with the approach stated above we considered the proposition made by Camelot against our statutory duties. 

Propriety (the game is fit and proper)

There were few issues in respect of propriety however we considered:

  • lawfulness of non-cash prizes in a draw-based game
  • Camelot’s ability to assist players in making an informed purchase
  • suitable funding arrangements in respect to cash and non-cash prizes. 

Protecting the interests of players

In respect of player protection, we considered some of the types of non-cash prizes Camelot proposes to offer players. Taking into account the following:

  • wider EuroMillions game that the non-cash prizes would be associated with
  • risks to player anonymity when non-cash prizes would be advertised.

We considered the controls and assurances provided by Camelot and deemed them to be satisfactory. On this basis we were content that the provision of non-cash prizes did not raise significant player protection issues. 

Returns to good causes

Following consideration of our two primary duties, we considered how much money the revised game would be likely to raise for good causes. Looking at the information supplied by Camelot we believe that the changes to the licence will lead to more money being returned to good causes.

Decision

Based on the information provided by Camelot and our considerations as outlined above we approved the variations to the Section 6 licence now known as the EuroMillions and UK Millionaire Maker Licence. 


December 2014
Rationale for agreeing request to reduce the percentage of sales that goes to the UK Millionaire Maker prize fund 

This was for a temporary decrease to the prize pay-out of the UK Millionaire Maker prize fund, effective from 30 December 2014. As of 1 April 2016, we agreed that this percentage will now revert back to its original level of 50%. 

In October 2014, Camelot sought approval to change the percentage of sales that goes to the UK Millionaire Maker prize fund from 50% to 42% (the prize pay-out). The UK Millionaire Maker is the UK raffle element of the EuroMillions game. The prize fund pays out guaranteed raffle prizes of £1 million, every Tuesday and Friday, and other promotional event prizes including non-cash prizes. 

Reducing the percentage of sales that goes to the prize fund will have the effect of increasing returns to good causes and, in the proportions agreed in the main licence, for Camelot.

The £1m prize for each draw will remain unaffected, and due to the amount built up in the reserve fund Camelot will still be able to offer the level of events intended for the UK Millionaire Maker game when it was initially approved. However, a proportion of funds that would previously have gone towards building the prize fund for future promotional prizes will now go to good causes (and Camelot).

We considered the proposition made by Camelot in context to our statutory duties.

Propriety (the game is fit and proper)

We found no issues relating to the legality of this change. If prize pay-out changes, up or down, it is appropriate that Camelot benefits or loses, in the same way as good causes, in line with the agreed retention structure. 

Whilst comfortable with this position we considered how the proposed reduction would impact on players. We considered that provided the change was appropriately communicated it was compatible with its propriety duty. 

Protecting the interests of players

We considered how the proposed reduction would impact on players’ experience of the game. We sought assurance from Camelot that whilst the prize pay-out is reducing, it can sustain the prizes it intended to offer players when the changes to the UK Millionaire Maker were approved in September 2014. 

We also sought assurance that the communication arrangements put in place to notify players of the changes would be appropriate. 

We considered the controls and assurances provided by Camelot and deemed them to be satisfactory. We are therefore content that players will not be disadvantaged by such a change. 

Returns to good causes

Following consideration of our two primary duties, we considered how much money the proposed change would be likely to raise for good causes. Looking at the information and forecasts supplied by Camelot, we are satisfied that this change to the licence will be beneficial to returns to good causes. 

Decision

Based on the information provided by Camelot and our considerations, we approve the request and variation to the EuroMillions and UK Millionaire Maker Section 6 Licence. 

Also see

EuroMillions licence

The full licence for the EuroMillions and UK Millionaire Maker

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